Colourful plates

Different colours and shapes of plates!

Glazes under microscope

Here are some photos of glazes under microscope. It’s like exploring space.

Living crystal structures captured in time. Microworlds hidden from our eyes. Poetry of nature.

Ceramics… Sometimes you don’t get to see its true beauty right away, by the naked eye. Sometimes, at first sight, it even appears to be ugly or primitive. Have to feel it first with your heart. And when you embrace it, you will discover whole space of endless beauty hidden inside of it…

New pinchpots!!

It’s been long time since we posted something on our blog, but today we finaly took some pictures of our latest work. This is what we made with blue, green, white and violet glazes made by David.

Black Pinchpots

Here are some black stoneware pinchpots that we made this winter: bowls in different sizes, mugs and plates with some of our tipical glazes that we developed by ourselves.

We could say this style of pottery is tipical for us, for example we make different variations of Moment mug for a few years now, we actually make them in three different sizes, the smallest is great for black coffee, the medium and  large size for white coffee or tea. The handle of this mug is also very special, it takes quite some precise work and skill to make it.

Also tipical is the metal looks that we get with combination of ceramic body and glazes. What else could we say about our black pots? As all of them are made with pinching technique we could say they are sort of primitive but on the other hand they are very thin which makes them elegante and  timeless in terms of design. Pinching is one of most ancient techniques of making pottery. Pots are shaped very slowely, completely by hands… pinch, pinch, pinch until you like the shape and make it thin enough. For us this is sort of meditation and is great mental therapy 🙂

 

Project: Woodfired!

 

Lately we’ve been working on our woodfire kiln. It’s actually a small test kiln inspired by japanese anagama. We fired it for three times, the results were better after every next firing, but the kiln fell a part after the last try, so probably we’ll not be able to fire it again. Anyway our plan for the future is to build a bigger kiln made of bricks.

It’s a special expedition every time we go woodfiring. We go to Kozarisce, where we used to live and where we started with our ceramics. There is David’s grandmothers house in this rural area of Slovenia. Kozarisce is a small village with a big castle surrounded by wast woods. Wild animals live in the woods and also the brown bear. Better not go to far in the woods at night! Ha ha!

It’s a few days project every time we are firing. Preparations have to be made, put the kiln together, make some improvements with the fire place, prepare the pieces and loading. Usually it takes one day. Since we go there together with our daughter, David does most of the “fire work”.

Here are some results of firing, we reached 1230 °C and the total firing time was 24 hours  in the first attempt and 28 hours in the last attempt.

 

 

 

Madeira glaze

This glaze is made of clay that our friend brought from the volcanic island of Madeira. The surface is brownish with spotts and when applied in thin layer it comes out darker, it’s matt and it doesn’t flow at firing temperature of 1250 ºC.

 

Završnica Glaze

We had quite some unhappy results with the dirt that we picked up in the valley of Završnica. The dirt contains probably a lot of calcium carbonate sands, which makes it very liquid when firing on high temperatures. David applied too much of this limestone sand pieces, because he wanted the glaze to flow. Teapot and mugs sticked to the  plate and we couldn’t save them. Teapot and two mugs will be ok for our home use.